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We have to consciously study how to be tender with each other until it becomes a habit.

- Audre Lorde (via ryanbhilliard)

Those who hear not the music… think the dancers mad.

- those who hear the music

"J Mason" - Emily Satis (2012), watercolor
From In Visible Skin, a watercolor portraiture series focusing on gender identity within the Philadelphia transgender community. Revealing personal narratives and insight from subjects will guide viewers through a complex conversation about gender representation not only in mainstream society, but in the LGBTQ community as well. By investigating gender stereotypes, viewers will be confronted with the complicated nature of identity, thus challenging their own beliefs of self-representation in everyday life.

"J Mason" - Emily Satis (2012), watercolor

From In Visible Skin, a watercolor portraiture series focusing on gender identity within the Philadelphia transgender community. Revealing personal narratives and insight from subjects will guide viewers through a complex conversation about gender representation not only in mainstream society, but in the LGBTQ community as well. By investigating gender stereotypes, viewers will be confronted with the complicated nature of identity, thus challenging their own beliefs of self-representation in everyday life.

barney-barrett:

Always do.

barney-barrett:

Always do.

why do you live in your body like you will be given another? as if it were temporary. you starve it, you let anyone touch it, you berate it. tell it that should be completely different. you tug at your soft flesh, wish it thinner, wish it gone. you fall in love with those who praise the way it sighs under their hands, but who praises the way it holds up your weight, even when you are falling apart?

- warsan shire  (via warsanshire)

(Source: chubby-angel)

We show our sympathy with slavery by emancipating slaves where we cannot reach them and holding them in bondage where we can set them free.

- Abraham Lincoln’s Secretary of State, William H. Seward, commenting on The Emancipation Proclamation (via eltigrechico)

Please Help Support the Pentridge Children's Garden!

The Pentridge Children’s Garden, where I am co-custodian, is entering its 21st season!

For the past 20 years, the garden has been a volunteer run green space where youth and families in West Philadelphia can learn to garden, play in a natural space, eat nutritious snacks, and participate in artistic and creative activities. The garden has grown in its lifetime to include two apple trees, a Concord grape vine, a fig tree, raspberries, strawberries, a herb circle and 15 beds for growing food and flowers. We are committed to food justice, as reflected in our mission statement:

“The Pentridge Children’s Garden is an urban garden located in South West Philadelphia dedicated to providing transformative educational space for children with limited access. We seek to resolve inequities within the local food system. We are doing this through community-based actions emphasizing accountability, sovereignty, and consciousness raising.”

Help us raise money to continue to run important programming and provide affordable and accessible food in the local neighborhood!

Your money will go towards:

buying tools
paying our water bill
buying seeds, art supplies, and snacks
finishing our greenhouse
repairing our shed
rebuilding our garden beds
fixing our water system
painting a mural in the garden
supporting “give away days” in the neighborhood, where folks can come and get free produce
giving youth a safe space to connect with the earth, each other and the power of growing their own food
expanding the number and quality of the community days and workshops we can offer in the garden this season

Thank you so much!!

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(Source: enricocanella)

southafricasmostfashionable:

Johannesburg street style

YAAAAAAASSSS!!!!

southafricasmostfashionable:

Johannesburg street style

YAAAAAAASSSS!!!!

“You guys know about vampires? … You know, vampires have no reflections in a mirror? There’s this idea that monsters don’t have reflections in a mirror. And what I’ve always thought isn’t that monsters don’t have reflections in a mirror. It’s that if you want to make a human being into a monster, deny them, at the cultural level, any reflection of themselves. And growing up, I felt like a monster in some ways. I didn’t see myself reflected at all. I was like, “Yo, is something wrong with me? That the whole society seems to think that people like me don’t exist? And part of what inspired me, was this deep desire that before I died, I would make a couple of mirrors. That I would make some mirrors so that kids like me might see themselves reflected back and might not feel so monstrous for it.”

- Junot Diaz (via Tatiana Richards)

(Source: issarae)


brownsugar203:

The Peacock Room (di earthmagnified)

Castello di Sammezzano in Reggello, Tuscany, Italy.

brownsugar203:

The Peacock Room (di earthmagnified)

Castello di Sammezzano in Reggello, Tuscany, Italy.

bklynboihood:

Ruth Ellis. 
She came out as a lesbian around 1915, and graduated from Springfield High School in 1919, at a time when fewer than seven percent of African Americans graduated from secondary school.
In the 1920s, she met the only woman she ever lived with, Ceciline “Babe” Franklin. They moved together to Detroit, Michigan in 1937 where Ellis became the first American woman to own a printing business in that city. She made a living printing stationery, fliers, and posters out of her house.
Ellis and Franklin’s house was also known in the African American community as the “gay spot”. It was a central location for gay and lesbian parties, and also served as a refuge for African American gays and lesbians. Although Ellis and Franklin eventually separated, they were together for more than 30 years. Franklin died in 1973.[2] Throughout her life, Ellis was an advocate of the rights of gays and lesbians, and of African Americans. She died in her sleep at her home on October 5, 2000.
(via wiki)

bklynboihood:

Ruth Ellis. 

She came out as a lesbian around 1915, and graduated from Springfield High School in 1919, at a time when fewer than seven percent of African Americans graduated from secondary school.

In the 1920s, she met the only woman she ever lived with, Ceciline “Babe” Franklin. They moved together to DetroitMichigan in 1937 where Ellis became the first American woman to own a printing business in that city. She made a living printing stationery, fliers, and posters out of her house.

Ellis and Franklin’s house was also known in the African American community as the “gay spot”. It was a central location for gay and lesbian parties, and also served as a refuge for African American gays and lesbians. Although Ellis and Franklin eventually separated, they were together for more than 30 years. Franklin died in 1973.[2] Throughout her life, Ellis was an advocate of the rights of gays and lesbians, and of African Americans. She died in her sleep at her home on October 5, 2000.

(via wiki)

Life is too short to be sensible.

- :P